Fowl Sets of Two

July 26, 2010

Or maybe that’s two sets of fowl…

There are two pale gray keets running around out in the pastures now, besides the original “Chick-or-Keet.”

young guinea birds

Two Gray Guinea Keets (and some siblings)

Strangely enough, the keets seem to shift parents.  I mean, sometimes I’ll look out and see two gray keets with a group of guineas, and then another time they’ll be split up and following a different set of adult guinea fowl.

Only thing I can figure out is they are roosting close together at night, and when they take off in the morning, the same keets aren’t always following the same adults.

Then yesterday morning when I went inside the peafowl pen to put out some more food, two of the peahens were growling at me.

peafowl

All four of peahens are sitting on eggs.

The two peahens in the back of the picture were the culprits.  And since they only time I ever hear them growl is when they have chicks, I figured they must have at least one, even if I could see any.

However, later in the afternoon those two hens were out in the aviary, and sure enough, they had a chick.

peafowl

Peahen checking on her peachicks

As a matter of fact, they have TWO chicks. . .

peachicks

Cute little peachicks!

They scurry around after their mamas, but they also have an adventuresome streak.

2 baby peafowl

Peachick Duet

I’ve noticed before that peachicks have a tendency to be more curious and range further from their mamas than the baby chickens, or even baby guinea fowl.

And I don’t feel so bad about not getting eggs to hatch in my incubator.  I noticed there are half a dozen eggs still in the nest, though the peahens are still turning them, so I guess they aren’t done.

It should be interesting to see how many peachicks we get.  I’ve never had ALL our peahens sitting on eggs before!

Thursday’s Thoughts: Thinking In Three’s

June 17, 2010

No deep thoughts today. My brain is too tired, ha! So here’s an easy one… thinking in three’s. I mean, if pictures are worth a thousand words, then there’s some serious thinking going on here, right?

This trio of bright orange fungus starting to grow on a rotten tree limb is likely Sulfur Shelf (Laetiporus sulphureus), also known as “Chicken of the Woods” because it is an edible mushroom that some people think tastes like chicken. (Just once, I’d like to hear someone say, “You know, that tastes like beef.” Or even pork. Just something besides chicken!)

Orange fungus on tree limb.

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This threesome is our older peacock with two of the peahens.

Peacock with two peahens.

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A trio of red roosters… they no longer reside here.  And we still have too many roosters!

Three Red Roosters

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These three trees are in our woods. This is an older picture taken back on a beautiful winter day in December of 2009.

Three Tall Trees

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These blooms, however, are on the plant right now. It’s a big Hosta ‘Blue Angel’.

Hosta ‘Blue Angel’ Blooms

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And finally, 3 blooms on a Chinese Sweetshrub.

Alas, that is not a tree we have growing here.  I took this picture when we were at a local nursery buying vegetable plants.

That’s it for today!  My brain is thinking more along the lines of Tired Thursday than Thinking Thursday, or Thursday’s Thoughts, or whatever.  So we have reached the conclusion of today’s post…

A conclusion is the place where you got tired thinking.” – Martin Henry Fischer

Even More Fowl Spring

March 8, 2010

The wild birds aren’t the only ones looking for a mate. Our peacocks are also strutting their stuff, trying to catch the lady peahens attention.

Peacock showing off.

Proud as a Peacock

What a lot of people don’t realize is that this pretty boy doesn’t just show off his plumage.  Nope, he also shakes and rattles his feathers, so they sound a lot like maracas.

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The junior peacock also tries to strut around and impress the ladies, but I’m afraid he just hasn’t got enough plumage yet to really “wow” them.

Peacock strutting.

"Darn! I guess size DOES matter."

He’s only a couple of years old, so his feathers don’t match the old dudes.  I’d guess his feathers are only about half as long as the older peacocks.

He’s a cheeky little devil for all that, but the girls still aren’t paying much attention to him.

That’s all right.  His time will come!

12 Days Of Christmas, Country Style

December 23, 2009

We do things different in the country.  If our true love sent us presents for 12 days of Christmas, we wouldn’t have any namby-pamby stuff like 12 Lords a leaping or 3 French hens.  No sir.  Here’s how WE’d do it:

On the first day of Christmas, my true love gave to me. . .
Christmas African Gray Parrot

A Parrot in our pantry!
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On the second day of Christmas my true love gave to me. . .Christmas Llamas

Two Loving Llamas!

and a Parrot in our pantry.


On the third day of Christmas, my true love gave to me. . .

3 Christmasy Shetland Sheep Ewes

Three frosty sheep!

two loving llamas,
and a Parrot in our pantry.


On the fourth day of Christmas, my true love gave to me. . .

Four Calling Birds

Four Calling Birds!

three frosty sheep,
two loving llamas,
and a Parrot in our pantry.


On the fifth day of Christmas, my true love gave to me. . .

5 Canning Rings!

Five Canning Rings!

four calling birds,
three frosty sheep,
two loving llamas,
and a Parrot in our pantry.


On the sixth day of Christmas, my true love gave to me. . .
Six hens a laying!

Six Hens A Laying!

five canning rings,
four calling birds,
three frosty sheep,
two loving llamas,
and a Parrot in our pantry.


On the seventh day of Christmas, my true love gave to me. . .

7 Turtles!

Seven Turtles Swimming!

six hens a laying,
five canning rings,
four calling birds,
three frosty sheep,
two loving llamas,
and a Parrot in our pantry.


On the eighth day of Christmas, my true love gave to me. . .
8 Goats For Milking!

Eight Goats For Milking!

seven turtles swimming,
six hens a laying,
five canning rings,
four calling birds,
three frosty sheep,
two loving llamas,
and a Parrot in our pantry.


On the ninth day of Christmas, my true love gave to me. . .
Nine Peacocks Prancing!

Nine Peacocks Prancing!

eight goats for milking,
seven turtles swimming,
six hens a laying,
five canning rings,
four calling birds,
three frosty sheep,
two loving llamas,
and a Parrot in our pantry.

 

On the tenth day of Christmas, my true love gave to me. . .10 Roosters Leaping!

Ten Roosters Leaping!

nine peacocks prancing,
eight goats for milking,
seven turtles swimming,
six hens a laying,
five canning rings,
four calling birds,
three frosty sheep,
two loving llamas,
and a Parrot in our pantry.


On the eleventh day of Christmas, my true love gave to me. . .

Eleven Chicks A Peeping!

Eleven Chicks A Peeping!

ten roosters leaping,
nine peacocks prancing,
eight goats for milking,
seven turtles swimming,
six hens a laying,
five canning rings,
four calling birds,
three frosty sheep,
two loving llamas,
and a Parrot in our pantry.

 

On the twelveth day of Christmas, my true love gave to me. . .
12 Guineas Grazing!

Twelve Guineas Grazing!

eleven chicks a peeping,
ten roosters leaping,
nine peacocks prancing,
eight goats for milking,
seven turtles swimming,
six hens a laying,
five canning rings,
four calling birds,
three frosty sheep,
two loving llamas,
and a Parrot in our pantry.

 


And THAT’s how we’d do presents for the 12 days of Christmas, country style.

Friday’s Farm Fotos

November 6, 2009

Another Friday, and I think I’ll share some of the pictures I took around the farm this week to make it another Friday’s Farm Foto’s Day!

This first one is of Samson, our male llama, out in the main pasture grazing.

Male llama, Samson, grazing.

All the animals seem to enjoy the medium length grasses in the main pasture, although the llamas like to browse the taller weeds along the fenceline too.

However, they don’t stay there all the time.  They have a routine, and part of the day the sheep and llamas and goat are in the back yard.  This particular picture is of one of our shyer Shetland sheep, Valrhona.

Shetland Sheep: our ewe, Valhrona.

Of course, our farm collie, Toby, can be found in the backyard almost any time, along with some chickens, plus the peacocks and peahens in their pen.

Toby, American Working Farmcollie

The signs of fall are everywhere, but when the sun shines just right on some of the trees along the edges of the bottom pasture, the leaves glint and make it look like the trees are full of white blossoms. I did a double take the first time I saw it. After all, it’s not time for trees to be in bloom!

Bbottom Pasture at Kings Keep Farm

Except, of course, the camellia is still blooming. Some of the blossoms look pretty ragged, but I don’t think this Grandaddy Long Legs minds.

Grandaddy Long Legs on Camellia bloom.

Did you know that these critters, also called harvestmen, aren’t really spiders?  They may look like one, but the biggest difference is that spiders have two body segments, whereas a Granddaddy Long Legs has an oval body that is only ONE segment. They also do not produce silk or a web, so turns out they are not true spiders.

The ferns back in the woods are still nice and green, but then, they stay pretty green all winter.

Ferns in woods on Kings Keep Farm.

The creeks and sloughs are full of colored leaves that have fallen from the trees.

Colored leaves floating on water.

Meanwhile, when the sun warms things up, there’s usually at least one little turtle on the long floating in the pond.

Small turtle on log in pond.

However, they are still very shy, and don’t let people get very close before they plop back down into the water and disappear.

And while our lone wandering white rooster is still AWOL, it seems we may have missed a couple of younger chickens that are roosters.  I looked out our dining room window yesterday and saw at least two roosters fighting.

Roosters fighting.

There was a third one nearby that acted like it might join the fray, but since it never did, I’m not sure if we have 2 or 3 young roosters running loose.

This morning I looked out to see a bunch of squirrels running up and down the fence posts.  This one peered inside a rotten post. . .

Squirrel looking in rotten fence post.

I think he’s wondering if he put any nuts in there.  Maybe I should tell him he’s looking in the wrong direction.

Cause there are some big nuts inside the house!