Quail Hatching Eggs

July 13, 2004

Quail Hatching Eggs. . .
Quail Hatching EggsLots of people like to raise gamebirds, and one of the popular types are quail.

You can buy chicks, or if you know someone nearby who raises quail, you might be able to buy some eggs from them.  Or perhaps you bought chicks or even adult quail, and they are now grown and laying eggs, and you want to try hatching some eggs in an incubator.

Whether you want to raise quail from eggs for your own use, or go into business of selling the quail, this article will give you some tips on how to take care of the eggs to get them to hatch out.

Bobwhite Quail Eggs

Bobwhite quail is the most commonly bred quail species in the world. Countless bobwhite quails are bred on farms to meet the ever-increasing demand for Bobwhite quail eggs worldwide. There are several websites over the Internet that sell eggs of bobwhite quail and even ship them to your destination. You must go through the various sites and compare their prices and offers. This way you will be able to select the best offers on the eggs.

Fully-grown bobwhite quail hens can lay more than 100 eggs per year. They can even lay more eggs if they are exposed to light for more than sixteen hours per day. The eggs are pure white in color. Eggs can be laid one each day. These eggs are more pointed compared to chicken eggs. Bobwhite quails are capable of producing large quantity of eggs. It is easy to raise them; they mix well and interbreed too. Hence, they are bred. Families in the business of selling this variety of quail eggs have farms and their generations carry on this activity. This has been going on for years.

Marketing: You must have your strategy in place if you wish to get into the business of hatching Bobwhite quail eggs. Few producers take orders for them even a year or two in advance.

Humidity & Temperature: Hatching quail eggs keep the humidity of the machine to about 60 per cent for the initial 20 days. For the last three days you can raise the humidity to 75 per cent. If there is not enough humidity the eggs might just dry off and the embryos might not survive. And for the last 3 days if humidity is too low the chicks might get stuck in their own shells if they try to hatch.

When you hatch the bobwhite variety of quail eggs ensure that you maintain the temperature of the air incubator at 99.5°F or 102°F, if you have a still-air incubator. You must place the incubator in a room where temperature does not fluctuate too much and is more or less stable. If you keep them at the right temperature in 23 days you will have great bobwhite chicks.

Turning: You must turn the eggs thrice a day for good results. You can put some marking on the eggs that will help you turn them properly and will ensure equal incubation on both sides of the egg. Last three days of hatching you must not turn the eggs. So, you must stop turning the quail eggs from day 21. Few tips for hatching or purchasing Bobwhite quail eggs: • Buy from producers who are well known and reputed • The stocks you choose must have a decent egg production history • Hatched eggs must be more or less uniform in size. There should not be any cracks on them. • Chicks must be active, alert and perfectly normal. • Birds must be free of disease. • Check the birds if possible that they are uniform in color, size, shape, etc. and that they are normal.

About the Author

G. Smitty is a writer who loves to discuss many topics ranging from button quail eggs to professional basketball. Thanks for reading!

Button Quail Hatching

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Dog On Farm

January 16, 2004

I like to have a dog on the farm.  They are good companions, and helpful keeping unwanted visitors away, both 2-legged and 4-legged.

This is a picture of a farm collie. They have been helping out on farms for years. A good farm collie is intelligent and indispensable!

Our farm collie is a source of fun, a joy to be around, and I woudn’t trade him for anything!

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Maremma Dogs

August 22, 2003

Maremma dogs come from Italy.  They were bred to guard livestock.  They’re not as commonly known or used in the states as a Great Pyrenees, but are a great breed of dog when you can find one!


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maremma dogs

Maremma Dog Breed Profile

The Maremma Sheepdog originated in the Italian Alps. It is a race that has a tremendous capacity to work in higher elevations. For many hundreds of years, the life of sheep, the shepherds and the Maremma dogs guarding the flock has been structured the seasons. From June to October the herds would be moved to the high country in the mountains of Abruzzo and from October to June they descended into the plains and the rolling pastures of the Maremma.

The work of the Maremma has always been that of a livestock protector and herding dog, being of great value for the Italian peasants as they moved with their herds of mountain goats and sheep through the pastures, not only livestock but also to protect the herd against predators. The Maremma has the ability to work independently as a protector of the herd and is distinguished by its high intelligence. Some dogs are protective remained firm and gradually became the Maremma is also known as the big white dog who frequented the fine houses of Tuscany as a companion and watchdog.

The Maremma is a large white dog with profuse and abundant coat. It might confuse the dog with the Pyrenees or the Kuvasz, extract the head of the Maremma is much larger in proportion to the body and is actually very similar to the polar bear, conical in shape and mass. In general large white dogs are dogs herds in Central Europe and the Alps, the Maremma is probably the race that this thinking is the most independent and one of the dogs considered a very protective dog, working in the dual role of guardian of the flock and Herder.

The Maremma is a large breed, standing 24 inches at the withers, with a thick layer that is all white with perhaps a shade of ivory or biscuit on the ears. The hair must be regularly maintained. The correct coat should be weather resistant, providing protection against the sun and cold, it’s a dog that should not be shaved.

The Maremma has always been around people, although its existence has been isolated, it is a race that will not do well without a man, to protect or work alongside. It’s a dog that wants to work for his master, but also can be difficult for a dog obedience commands simple, since it is a “thinker” and bored with repetition. They are extremely loyal, considered a dog of a person, devoted and protective yet proud and dignified. It’s a dog that needs a knowledgeable owner, since it is not inclined to be obedient, but is more likely to be a little stubborn and strong will.

Chicken Hatching Eggs

July 28, 2003

Chicken Hatching Eggs. . .
If you raise chickens, and have both hens and at least one rooster, sooner or later you care going to have to deal with a broody chicken.

In case you are not familiar with the term, a broody chicken is one that is trying to sit on the nest and hatch out some chicks from their eggs.  If you want some new chickens, then this is a good thing.  However, if you want to gather eggs, and let the chicken keep laying, then you need to know how to deal with a broody chicken.

This article has some hints to help you deal with chickens trying to sit on eggs to hatch them.

Continue reading

Dogs On Farm

May 10, 2002

No farm is complete without dogs.  Here’s a couple we have:

There are all kinds of dogs on the farm.  Not just on our farm of course, but all over the world.  There are many breeds that are in the working class, including such dogs as:

  • American Farm Collie
  • Anatolian Shepherd
  • Australian Cattle Dog
  • Belgian Sheepdog
  • Bernese Mountain Dog
  • Border Collie
  • Great Pyrenees
  • Greater Swiss Mountain Dog
  • Komondor
  • Kuvasz
  • Old English Sheepdog

 

Dogs can perform many useful functions.  Besides being great companions for people, they can be general guard dogs, or they can be livestock guardian dogs.  The latter type of working dogs are meant to stay with their charges all the time, and keep them safe from predators.

Here’s an unusual occupation for dogs on the farm…. catching rats:
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Who’ have thought?  Most of the time you think of cats as being the rodent patrol on a farm!

On our farmstead we happen to have a farm collie and a Maremma sheepdog.  But there many other good breeds for the farm.  Decide what you need the dog to do, then go looking at different breeds to see which most closely matches you needs.

Do keep in mind, however, that just because a breed is supposed to be good at a certain thing, like herding, once in a while a particular dog does NOT have the trait mentioned for that breed.  Dogs are individuals, and while most have the breed characteristics, it’s not a 100% given that every dog of that breed will.

To find the breed that will most likely suit your needs, check out a breed selector like the one found on Animal Planet.  It can help guide you through finding dogs that meet your needs.  You choose from the various criteria, like size of the dog, length of the dog coat, and more, to aide the selection process.

Choose wisely so both you and the dog will be happy with your choice!

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